January 10th, 2013
illumanu:

13th or 14th century (1275-1325) Southern France - Toulouse?
British Library, Royal 10 E IV: I. (1v-3v) Calendarium, II. Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria 
fol. 77v - bas-de-page detail of a woman with a tabor.
Her hair is braided and loosely fastened on top of her head, forming almost pouches, when viewed from the front. Both the kirtle and the overkirtle are blue and the overkirtle is upturned at the hem - fastening the impractical length of the skirt and showing of the vair lining at the same time. The sleeves are cut to form tippets.
source - British Library catalogues
After the holiday hiatus, Illumanu is back!

illumanu:

13th or 14th century (1275-1325) Southern France - Toulouse?

British Library, Royal 10 E IV: I. (1v-3v) Calendarium, II. Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria

fol. 77v - bas-de-page detail of a woman with a tabor.

Her hair is braided and loosely fastened on top of her head, forming almost pouches, when viewed from the front. Both the kirtle and the overkirtle are blue and the overkirtle is upturned at the hem - fastening the impractical length of the skirt and showing of the vair lining at the same time. The sleeves are cut to form tippets.

source - British Library catalogues

After the holiday hiatus, Illumanu is back!

(via frenchhistory)

January 9th, 2013

Culture Minute

frenchhistory:

kisu-no-hi:

In France, we never say “good luck” because we believe it will actually bring you bad luck if we do. Instead, we say “Merde!” which literally means “Shit”

This may sounds very confusing but there is actually an explanation behind this expression.

It comes from the time when people still used carriages with horses. When there were performances at the theatre or at the opera for example, people would tell the actors “Merde!”

Why?

Because when the carriages were left waiting in front of the theatre, the horses would most likely end up shitting all over the pavement. And the more shit there was, the more people came to see your performance. “Merde” was an innuendo for “I hope there will be a lot of shit in front of the theatre tonight because that would mean a lot of people came to see you and it was a success”

This expression is still used today for everything and anything where you need some luck. (It doesn’t really make sense anymore though, I do admit)

Who said French was a classy language?

image

I use both, bonne chance and merde. But I would never thank someone who wishes me merde, because it brings bad luck.

January 7th, 2013
bobbycaputo:

Gardens at Versailles, France
Photograph by Emmanuel Lattes, Alamy
Orange trees outline a formal garden at Versailles, once the epicenter of French royal power. The Versailles gardens took 40 years to complete; Louis XIV valued them as much as the palace. During the winter, the fruit trees are moved inside.

bobbycaputo:

Gardens at Versailles, France

Photograph by Emmanuel Lattes, Alamy

Orange trees outline a formal garden at Versailles, once the epicenter of French royal power. The Versailles gardens took 40 years to complete; Louis XIV valued them as much as the palace. During the winter, the fruit trees are moved inside.

January 4th, 2013
a-l-ancien-regime:

Petit Trianon, Versailles (detail)

a-l-ancien-regime:

Petit Trianon, Versailles (detail)

(via frenchhistory)

December 12th, 2012
oldbookillustrations:

In the space of a few minutes, twenty iron bars had been wrenched from the grated front of the wine-shop.
Gustave Brion, from Les Misérables, by Victor Hugo, Paris, 1867.
(This barricade just *has* to be for edwarddespard.)
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

In the space of a few minutes, twenty iron bars had been wrenched from the grated front of the wine-shop.

Gustave Brion, from Les Misérables, by Victor Hugo, Paris, 1867.

(This barricade just *has* to be for edwarddespard.)

(Source: archive.org)

December 3rd, 2012

collective-history:

Today in History: December 2, 1804, The Coronation of Napoleon Bonaparte

In Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, Napoleon Bonaparte is crowned Napoleon I, the first Frenchman to hold the title of emperor in a thousand years. 

The ceremony had started at nine a.m. when the Papal procession set out from the Tuileries. The procession was led by a bishop on a mule holding aloft the Papal crucifix. The Pope entered Notre Dame first, to the anthem Tu es Petrus, and took his seat on a throne near the high altar.

The two-part ceremony was held at different ends of Notre Dame to emphasize the disconnectedness of religious and secular facets. An unmanned balloon, ablaze with three thousand lights in an imperial crown pattern was launched from the front of Notre Dame during the celebration.

At the moment of the crowning when the Pope said, “Receive the imperial crown…” Napoleon unexpectedly turned and, forestalling the Pope, removed his laurel wreath and crowned himself and then crowned the kneeling Joséphine with a small crown surmounted by a cross, which he had first placed on his own head. At Napoleon’s enthronement the Pope said, “May God confirm you on this throne and may Christ give you to rule with him in his eternal kingdom”.

Limited in his actions, Pius VII proclaimed further the Latin formula “Vivat imperator in aeternum!” (May the Emperor live forever!), which was echoed by the full choirs in a Vivat, followed by “Te Deum”. With his hands on the Bible, Napoleon took the oath:

“I swear to maintain the integrity of the territory of the Republic, to respect and enforce respect for the Concordat and freedom of religion, equality of rights, political and civil liberty, the irrevocability of the sale of national lands; not to raise any tax except in virtue of the law; to maintain the institution of Legion of Honor and to govern in the sole interest, happiness and glory of the French people”.

After the oath the newly appointed herald of arms proclaimed loudly: “The thrice glorious and thrice august Emperor Napoleon is crowned and enthroned. Long live the Emperor!” During the people’s acclamations Napoleon, surrounded by dignitaries, left the cathedral while the choir sang “Domine salvum fac imperatorem nostrum Napoleonem”—”God save our Emperor Napoleon”.

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

November 26th, 2012

Panel of dress fabric with floral meander
French: Silk tabby, liseré and brocaded with silver lamella, filé and friséCentimetres: 85 (length), 54.4 (width)
1740 – 1760/Rococo - Area of Origin: France (Lyon)
@credits

Panel of dress fabric with floral meander

French: Silk tabby, liseré and brocaded with silver lamella, filé and friséCentimetres: 85 (length), 54.4 (width)

1740 – 1760/Rococo - Area of Origin: France (Lyon)

@credits

(Source: frenchhistory)

November 22nd, 2012
frenchhistory:


The notable Clicquot organ of the Versailles Chapel
@credits

Robert Clicquot (1645–1719) was a French organ builder from Paris. His most notable organs are in the Chapel of the Palace of Versailles, the churches of Saint-Quentin and Saint-Louis des Invalides in Paris and Rouen Cathedral.
Clicquot’s descendants continued in the family business. His son Louis-Alexandre built the organ of Rozay-en-Brie and in 1734 that of the Church of Saint-Jacques de Saint-Christopher Houdan which is the oldest organ in the Île-de-France still in operation. François-Henri Clicquot(1732–1790), Robert’s grandson, built the monumental organ of Saint-Sulpice as well as those in Souvigny (1782) and in Poitiers Cathedral.

frenchhistory:

The notable Clicquot organ of the Versailles Chapel

@credits

Robert Clicquot (1645–1719) was a French organ builder from Paris. His most notable organs are in the Chapel of the Palace of Versailles, the churches of Saint-Quentin and Saint-Louis des Invalides in Paris and Rouen Cathedral.

Clicquot’s descendants continued in the family business. His son Louis-Alexandre built the organ of Rozay-en-Brie and in 1734 that of the Church of Saint-Jacques de Saint-Christopher Houdan which is the oldest organ in the Île-de-France still in operation. François-Henri Clicquot(1732–1790), Robert’s grandson, built the monumental organ of Saint-Sulpice as well as those in Souvigny (1782) and in Poitiers Cathedral.

November 18th, 2012
collective-history:

Today in History: Louis XVIII is born on 17 November 1755
Louis XVIII, known as “the Desired,” was a Bourbon King of France and of Navarre from 1814 to 1824, omitting the Hundred Days in 1815. 
During the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era, Louis XVIII lived in exile in Prussia, the United Kingdom and Russia. When the Sixth Coalition finally defeated Napoleon, Louis XVIII was restored to what he, and Royalists, considered his rightful place. This period was marked by an Ultra-royalist reaction. However Napoleon escaped from his exile in Elba, marched on Paris and restored the French Empire. Louis XVIII fled and a Seventh Coalition declared war on the French Empire, defeated Napoleon and for a second time restored Louis XVIII on the French throne. In 1823, Louis XVIII sent an expeditionary corps, known as the “Hundred Thousand Sons of Saint Louis”, in Spain to restore the absolute King of Spain.
Louis XVIII ruled as king for slightly less than a decade and was the last French monarch to die while reigning.

collective-history:

Today in History: Louis XVIII is born on 17 November 1755

Louis XVIII, known as “the Desired,” was a Bourbon King of France and of Navarre from 1814 to 1824, omitting the Hundred Days in 1815. 

During the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era, Louis XVIII lived in exile in Prussia, the United Kingdom and Russia. When the Sixth Coalition finally defeated Napoleon, Louis XVIII was restored to what he, and Royalists, considered his rightful place. This period was marked by an Ultra-royalist reaction. However Napoleon escaped from his exile in Elba, marched on Paris and restored the French Empire. Louis XVIII fled and a Seventh Coalition declared war on the French Empire, defeated Napoleon and for a second time restored Louis XVIII on the French throne. In 1823, Louis XVIII sent an expeditionary corps, known as the “Hundred Thousand Sons of Saint Louis”, in Spain to restore the absolute King of Spain.

Louis XVIII ruled as king for slightly less than a decade and was the last French monarch to die while reigning.

(via frenchhistory)

November 17th, 2012
frenchhistory:

Man’s Shirt and Trousers
Material: Shirt of white plain-weave linen; trousers of beige striped cotton satin.

Jacket and Petticoat
Material: French jacket of red striped plain-weave cotton with center-front lacing; petticoat of white cotton woven quilting (matelassé)
@credits

An example of the style of clothing worn by the working class around the time of the French Revolution, characterized by the long trousers worn by men, rather than the breeches. With the outbreak of the revolution in 1789, people began to use fashion as a means of expressing one’s ideology. The revolutionaries regarded luxurious and extravagant silk as the enemy of the revolution, replacing breeches and white silk stockings - the symbol of aristocracy - with the long trousers worn by the lower classes, in an attempt to distance themselves from the previous era.

frenchhistory:

Man’s Shirt and Trousers
Material: Shirt of white plain-weave linen; trousers of beige striped cotton satin.
Jacket and Petticoat
Material: French jacket of red striped plain-weave cotton with center-front lacing; petticoat of white cotton woven quilting (matelassé)

@credits

An example of the style of clothing worn by the working class around the time of the French Revolution, characterized by the long trousers worn by men, rather than the breeches.
With the outbreak of the revolution in 1789, people began to use fashion as a means of expressing one’s ideology. The revolutionaries regarded luxurious and extravagant silk as the enemy of the revolution, replacing breeches and white silk stockings - the symbol of aristocracy - with the long trousers worn by the lower classes, in an attempt to distance themselves from the previous era.

November 16th, 2012
frenchhistory:


Buste de la Dame Carcas devant la porte narbonnaise
@credits

The legend of Lady Carcas attempts to explain the origin of the name of the city of Carcassonne.
History says that Charlemagne’s army was at the gates of the city facing the Saracens. A princess was at the head of the Knights of the City after the death of her husband. This is Princess Carcas. The siege lasted five years.
But early in the sixth year, food and water were becoming increasingly rare. Lady Carcass would take inventory of all reserves remaining. The villagers brought him a pig and a sack of wheat. She then had the idea to feed the pig with the sack of wheat and then precipitate it from the highest tower of the City outside the ramparts.
Charlemagne and his men, believing that the city was full of food even to the point of wasting pigs fed with wheat, raised the siege. Seeing Charlemagne’s army to leave the plain before the city, Lady Carcas elated by the victory of her stratagem decided to ring all the bells of the city. One of the men of Charlemagne then exclaimed: “Carcas sonne!” (it mean’s “Carcas rings”). Hence the name of the City.
Lady Carcass is a purely imaginary character. The legend that dates back to the twelfth century, was written in the sixteenth by Jean Dupre and rewritten in the seventeenth century by Guillaume Besse and Guillaume Catel. Charlemagne did not make the siege of Carcassonne, his father Pepin having already taken the Saracens in 759

frenchhistory:

Buste de la Dame Carcas devant la porte narbonnaise

@credits

The legend of Lady Carcas attempts to explain the origin of the name of the city of Carcassonne.

History says that Charlemagne’s army was at the gates of the city facing the Saracens. A princess was at the head of the Knights of the City after the death of her husband. This is Princess Carcas. The siege lasted five years.

But early in the sixth year, food and water were becoming increasingly rare. Lady Carcass would take inventory of all reserves remaining. The villagers brought him a pig and a sack of wheat. She then had the idea to feed the pig with the sack of wheat and then precipitate it from the highest tower of the City outside the ramparts.

Charlemagne and his men, believing that the city was full of food even to the point of wasting pigs fed with wheat, raised the siege. Seeing Charlemagne’s army to leave the plain before the city, Lady Carcas elated by the victory of her stratagem decided to ring all the bells of the city. One of the men of Charlemagne then exclaimed: “Carcas sonne!” (it mean’s “Carcas rings”). Hence the name of the City.

Lady Carcass is a purely imaginary character. The legend that dates back to the twelfth century, was written in the sixteenth by Jean Dupre and rewritten in the seventeenth century by Guillaume Besse and Guillaume Catel. Charlemagne did not make the siege of Carcassonne, his father Pepin having already taken the Saracens in 759

October 28th, 2012
augeycaida:

Homenaje a Clodoveo II, de Albert Maignan. Rey franco, llamado el Perezoso, perteneciente a la dinastia Merovingia y gobernante de los reinos Neustria y Borgoña. Estuvo casado con Santa Batilda de Ascania y tuvo tres hijos, Erquinoaldo, Clotario y Teoderico. Su padre, Dagoberto I, dividió sus reinos entre sus dos hijos, Sigeberto y Clodoveo, con los que dio el inicio el período de los “reyes holgazanes”. Donde los reyes cedieron su poder a los mayordomos de palacio. Íntimamente ligados a la dinastia pipínida a la que pertenecieron grandes personajes como Carlos Martel, Pipino el Breve, primer mayordomo que accedió a la corona, Carlomán y Carlos el Grande, quien consiguió el título de Rey de Romanos y Emperador. 

This painting is so gorgeous!

augeycaida:

Homenaje a Clodoveo II, de Albert Maignan. Rey franco, llamado el Perezoso, perteneciente a la dinastia Merovingia y gobernante de los reinos Neustria y Borgoña. Estuvo casado con Santa Batilda de Ascania y tuvo tres hijos, Erquinoaldo, Clotario y Teoderico. Su padre, Dagoberto I, dividió sus reinos entre sus dos hijos, Sigeberto y Clodoveo, con los que dio el inicio el período de los “reyes holgazanes”. Donde los reyes cedieron su poder a los mayordomos de palacio. Íntimamente ligados a la dinastia pipínida a la que pertenecieron grandes personajes como Carlos Martel, Pipino el Breve, primer mayordomo que accedió a la corona, CarlománCarlos el Grande, quien consiguió el título de Rey de Romanos y Emperador

This painting is so gorgeous!

October 27th, 2012

Fragment de tenture éxécutée pour la chambre de Louis XVIII aux Tuileries, 1818
@credits

Fragment de tenture éxécutée pour la chambre de Louis XVIII aux Tuileries, 1818

@credits

(Source: frenchhistory)

October 25th, 2012
frenchhistory:

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

mediumaevum:

Dear followers,
This beautiful building is the Knights Templar chapel of Libdeau (12th century), near Toul (Lorraine, France). However, it is decaying very fast and it needs help. Plans for restoration are already finished, all that remains is, of course, the money.
If you want to help, you can donate via PayPal or by cheque: 
Ordre of CERCTL22 rue de Liverdun 54380 Saizerais FRANCE
or at least share this post. Thank you!
Here are some additional links in case you want to see more about the project.
Video1 Video2 Facebook

Oh nooo! Please forgive me, I know this isn’t a history crush by any means, but if you’re a lover of history in general and you have a bit of money to spare or a place in your blog to pass it on I’m sure they would appreciate it immensely! They obviously care very much about this chapel and it always makes me sad to see pieces of history collapse like this. Thanks so much, guys!

(I’m just reblogging this one more time because when I originally reblogged it it was at 4am central time so I think a lot of people missed it; thanks again!)

I’m glad you did. As a Lorrainer, I’d be happy to participate (and to visit the place if I have the occasion)

frenchhistory:

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

mediumaevum:

Dear followers,

This beautiful building is the Knights Templar chapel of Libdeau (12th century), near Toul (Lorraine, France). However, it is decaying very fast and it needs help. Plans for restoration are already finished, all that remains is, of course, the money.

If you want to help, you can donate via PayPal or by cheque:

Ordre of CERCTL
22 rue de Liverdun 54380 
Saizerais FRANCE

or at least share this post. Thank you!

Here are some additional links in case you want to see more about the project.

Video1 Video2 Facebook

Oh nooo! Please forgive me, I know this isn’t a history crush by any means, but if you’re a lover of history in general and you have a bit of money to spare or a place in your blog to pass it on I’m sure they would appreciate it immensely! They obviously care very much about this chapel and it always makes me sad to see pieces of history collapse like this. Thanks so much, guys!

(I’m just reblogging this one more time because when I originally reblogged it it was at 4am central time so I think a lot of people missed it; thanks again!)

I’m glad you did. As a Lorrainer, I’d be happy to participate (and to visit the place if I have the occasion)

October 18th, 2012